Study: Video Game May Help More With Duchenne

Game measure patients’ abilities, hope is data will get more into clinical trials

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Cole Eichelberger, 13, plays a video game that helps chart the strength and ability to move his upper body. Cole has Duchenne muscular dystrophy and has trouble walking which, according to current guidelines, can prevent some patients from taking part in clinical trials. Experts at Nationwide Children`s Hospital developed the game in the hopes of convincing the FDA to accept patients based on their upper body abilities, not just relying on the standard `walk test.` Details: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)  – In an effort to increase the number of patients who are allowed take part in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have developed an innovative video game.  “The object of the game is to use your arms and hands to ward off attacking aliens, but the benefits of this game could be far-reaching,” said Linda Lowes, PhD, co-developer of the game.  “This approach allows us to accurately and consistently track the upper body abilities of these patients, which we’re hoping will make more of them eligible for medical studies,” she said.

Currently, the FDA only allows patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy to participate in clinical trials if they can pass a six-minute walk test.  “The problem is, that excludes most of these patients, many of whom are teenage boys who are confined to wheelchairs” said Lindsay Alfano, a physical therapist and co-creator of the game.  “We think they could add a lot to clinical trials, and possibly get a lot from them, if only they were allowed to participate,” she said.

A new study underscores the effectiveness of the video game approach, information experts are hoping to share with the FDA.

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Cole Eichelberger, 13, plays a video game that helps chart the strength and ability to move his upper body. Cole has Duchenne muscular dystrophy and has trouble walking which, according to current guidelines, can prevent some patients from taking part in clinical trials. Experts at Nationwide Children`s Hospital developed the game in the hopes of convincing the FDA to accept patients based on their upper body abilities, not just relying on the standard `walk test.` Details: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

The object of the game is to smoosh aliens, but the benefits of the game could be far-reaching. Experts at Nationwide Children`s Hospital have developed the game as a way to chart the upper body function of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, like 13-year old Cole Eichelberger. They hope the data will help expand the number of patients who are eligible for clinical trials. To see what kind of impact the video game could have, click here: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

Linda Lowes, PhD, of Nationwide Children`s Hospital, measures the arm of Cole Eichelberger before the two begin a session to test out a new video game. Lowes helped develop the game for patients who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an effort to better assess and track their upper body function. See how patients could benefit if the approach is accepted by the FDA: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

Cole Eichelberger, 13, helps test a new video game developed by experts at Nationwide Children`s Hospital. Eichelberger has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which often confines patients to wheelchairs at an early age and prevents them from taking part in clinical trials. Experts are hoping the video game, which charts the upper body function of patients, will help expand medical trials to include more patients, regardless of their inability to walk. Details: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

Linda Lowes, PhD and Lindsay Alfano, DPT, look over data from a video game they developed at Nationwide Children`s Hospital. The game is designed to assess and track the upper body function of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Experts here are hoping that data will be compelling and significant enough to expand the number of patients who are allowed to participate in medical studies for Duchenne. See why that`s important by clicking here: bit.ly/1ppuHgP

Linda Lowes, PhD and Lindsay Alfano, PT, analyze data from a video game they developed for patients at Nationwide Children`s Hospital. The game is designed for young patients who suffer from Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Current guidelines say if a patient can`t pass a six-minute walk test, they cannot participate in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Experts are hoping that data from their video game, which tracks upper body function, will be compelling enough to change those guidelines and open up medical studies to more children with the disease, even if they are unable to walk for six minutes. Details here: bit.ly/1ppuHgP