Roles Of Athletic Trainers In Basketball Injuries

Study tracks 2.5 million basketball injuries in teens, finds need for athletic trainers

Featured Video Play Icon
Kerry Waple, an athletic trainer at Nationwide Children`s Hospital, examines the knee of a young athlete. Fewer than half of all high schools employ athletic trainers and the numbers may be even worse in middle schools. Researchers at Nationwide Children`s Hospital say athletic trainers can play an important role in more efficiently treating student athletes and rehabbing them safely to return to play. Experts looked at high school basketball injuries between 2005-2011, and found that injured players went to emergency departments 42% more often, sometimes unnecessarily.

Researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital studied injuries between 2005-2011 in the U.S. and found that more than 2.5 million high school basketball players were injured and there aren’t nearly enough athletic trainers were in schools to care for them.

“That’s a lot of injuries, that’s a lot of medical care and a lot of time lost from a sport that kids really like to play,” said Lara McKenzie, PhD, the lead author of the study and principal investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Because only about 42% of high schools have athletic trainers on staff a vast majority of injured players wind up in urgent care facilities and emergency departments, some unnecessarily.  “With more athletic trainers working in our schools, we could care for injured players much more efficiently,” said McKenzie.

Images

(click to download)

Kerry Waple, an athletic trainer, looks at the ankle of RJ Mehan in Worthington, Ohio. Experts say fewer than half of all high schools have athletic trainers on hand to treat and help rehab injured athletes, and the numbers are even worse at the middle school level. Because of that, according to a new study from Nationwide Children`s Hospital, injured basketball players went to emergency departments 42% more frequently between 2005-2011. Researchers say athletic trainers can more efficiently assess injuries and hold down costs by only sending injured players to doctors who actually need to see them.

According to a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children`s Hospital, between 2005-2011 more than 2.5 million high school basketball players were treated for injuries. Because fewer than half of all high schools in the U.S. have athletic trainers on staff, the majority of those injured players were treated in emergency departments, often unnecessarily. Researchers are calling for the use of more athletic trainers who can more efficiently care for injured athletes and help them rehab their injuries safely.

Kerry Waple, an athletic trainer at Nationwide Children`s Hospital, examines the knee of a young athlete. Fewer than half of all high schools employ athletic trainers and the numbers may be even worse in middle schools. Researchers at Nationwide Children`s Hospital say athletic trainers can play an important role in more efficiently treating student athletes and rehabbing them safely to return to play. Experts looked at high school basketball injuries between 2005-2011, and found that injured players went to emergency departments 42% more often, sometimes unnecessarily.

In a new study, researchers at Nationwide Children`s Hospital found that basketball players injured between the years of 2005-2011 were treated in emergency departments 42% more often than by athletic trainers, impacting the resources of both the players` families and the health care system. Researchers say athletic trainers can more efficiently assess injuries to high school athletes and can help rehabilitate them more effectively to prevent further injury than family doctors or emergency room staffs.