Consumers Warned About Dangers Of Laundry Pods

Doctors call for safety standards as pods continue to harm kids

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A new study shows more than 17,000 children were involved in incidents with laundry detergent pods from 2012 through 2013, an average of one child every hour. The study was conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital. While many of the children swallowed the highly concentrated chemicals in the pods, others sustained skin or eye injuries after the pods burst. To learn more about the study, click here: bit.ly/1vrney3

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – Consumer Reports announced it will no longer recommend liquid laundry detergent pods because of the risk of accidental poisonings of young children. Instead, it is recommending households with kids under six use regular detergent. Doctors from Nationwide Children’s Hospital were the first to publish a national study and call for consumer changes like this.

The study detailed the dangers of laundry detergent pods, researchers called for a national product safety standard in an effort to better protect children. “Our study showed that during a two year period, there were more than 17,000 children exposed to the highly concentrated chemicals in laundry detergent pods.  That’s a child every hour,” said Gary Smith, MD DrPH, director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

Smith, the study’s senior author, says children often mistake the the small, brightly-colored laundry pods for candy and bite into them.  “Once they do that, they can get into trouble very quickly,” added Marcel Casavant, MD, who collaborated on the study.  “The chemicals in these pods are so concentrated that a child can be exposed to a dangerous amount in an instant,” he said.

“The bottom line is, we need a new, voluntary safety standard for these products before any more children get hurt,” added Dr. Smith.

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A new study shows more than 17,000 children were involved in incidents with laundry detergent pods from 2012 through 2013, an average of one child every hour. The study was conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital. While many of the children swallowed the highly concentrated chemicals in the pods, others sustained skin or eye injuries after the pods burst. To learn more about the study, click here: bit.ly/1vrney3

Tracy Mehan demonstrates the visual similarities between laundry detergent pods and some children`s snacks. Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital are calling for a national product safety standard after a new study charted more than 17,000 incidents involving children and laundry detergent pods in a 2-year period. Details on the study here: bit.ly/1vrney3

It may be hard for children to tell which of these items are candy and which are laundry detergent pods. A new study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital found more than 17,000 incidents involving children and laundry detergent pods from 2012 through 2013, prompting calls for improved guidelines and packaging to prevent poisonings in children. Details: bit.ly/1vrney3

Every hour in the U.S., a child swallows, inhales or otherwise comes into contact with the highly concentrated chemicals inside laundry detergent pods. A new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital charted more than 17,000 cases from 2012 through 2013. Details of the study here: bit.ly/1vrney3

Tracy Mehan talks with a young girl who has trouble distinguishing an actual laundry detergent pod from a look-alike that researchers created with a fruit flavored drink. A newly published study by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital found more than 17,000 incidents involving children and laundry pods from 2012 through 2013, an average of one child per hour every day. During a controlled demonstration many children had trouble distinguishing laundry detergent pods from candy and snacks. For more on the study click here: bit.ly/1vrney3

Dr. Marcel Casavant of Nationwide Children`s Hospital demonstrates how quickly laundry pods can dissolve and release highly concentrated chemicals. In a newly published study, Casavant and researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children`s Hospital found more than 17,000 incidents in which children were exposed to laundry detergent pods in a 2-year period, and many of those children were injured or poisoned. For more on the study click here: bit.ly/1vrney3